Gold Maple Leaf series coins

Gold Maple Leaf series coins

The Gold Maple Leaf series are bullion coins issued since 1979 by the Government of Canada. The royal mint is responsible for the production of the coins of this series. Since the first issue, the series has become one of the most significant and popular in the world. It even already outran the most famous Krugerrand. Gold coins of the Maple Leaf series with a face value of 50 dollars are legal tender in Canada, however, the nominal value of these coins is mere formality. The cost of each copy is calculated depending on the current rate of gold on world exchanges.

Standard gold coins

Most coins have fineness of a .9999 (24 carats), which makes them one of the cleanest official coins around the world. The most common versions of coins have a weight of at least 1 troy ounce (31.10 grams). On the obverse of the coins there are portraits of Queen Elizabeth, and on the reverse – the national symbol, the maple leaf. Also, you can see the denomination, fineness, weight and year of issue of the coin on the reverse.

  • Issue of 1979-1982, weight 1 tr. oz, fineness of .999. The obverse depicts the portrait of Queen Elizabeth at the age of 39.
  • Issue of November, 1982-1985, weight 1 tr. oz, 1⁄4 tr. oz, 1⁄10 tr. oz, fineness of .9999. The obverse depicts the portrait of Queen Elizabeth at the age of 39.
  • Issue of 1986-1989, weight 1 tr. oz, 1⁄2 tr. oz, 1⁄4 tr. oz, 1⁄10 tr. oz, fineness of .9999. The obverse depicts the portrait of Queen Elizabeth at the age of 39.
  • Issue of 1990-1992, weight 1 tr. oz, 1⁄2 tr. oz, 1⁄4 tr. oz, 1⁄10 tr. oz, fineness of .9999. The obverse depicts the portrait of Queen Elizabeth at the age of 64.
  • Issue of 1993, weight 1 tr. oz, 1⁄2 tr. oz, 1⁄4 tr. oz, 1⁄10 tr. oz, 1⁄20 tr. oz, fineness of .9999. The obverse depicts the portrait of Queen Elizabeth at the age of 64.
  • Issue of 1994, weight 1 tr. oz, 1⁄2 tr. oz, 1⁄4 tr. oz, 1⁄10 tr. oz, 1⁄15 tr. oz, 1⁄20 tr. oz, fineness of .9999. The obverse depicts the portrait of Queen Elizabeth at the age of 64.
  • Issue of 1995–2004, weight 1 tr. oz, 1⁄2 tr. oz, 1⁄4 tr. oz, 1⁄10 tr. oz, 1⁄20 tr. oz, fineness of .9999. The obverse depicts the portrait of Queen Elizabeth at the age of 64.
  • Issue of 2005–2013, weight 1 tr. oz, 1⁄2 tr. oz, 1⁄4 tr. oz, 1⁄10 tr. oz, 1⁄20 tr. oz, fineness of .9999. The obverse depicts the portrait of Queen Elizabeth at the age of 79.

Issue of 2014–present time, weight 1 tr. oz, 1⁄2 tr. oz, 1⁄4 tr. oz, 1⁄10 tr. oz, 1⁄20 tr. oz, 1 gram, fineness of .9999. The obverse depicts the portrait of Queen Elizabeth at the age of 79.

canadiangolden

Coins of special series

Up to the end of 1982, the gold coins were issued with a fineness of .999, then the standard was raised to .9999. The coins with a fineness of .99999 are only issued in special series. Also, the coins with a maple leaf are issued dedicated to memorable dates or important events for the country.

99.999% Gold Maple Leaf

  • Issue of 2005, 50 dollar denomination, circulation – 600 (additional – 396).
  • Issue of 2007, 200 dollar denomination, circulation – 500. Test emission.
  • Issue of 2007, 200 dollar denomination, circulation – 30,848.
  • Issue of 2007, 1,000,000 dollar denomination, circulation – 5.
  • Issue of 2008, 200 dollar denomination, circulation – 1,700. Special limited issue, test circulation.
  • Issue of 2008, 200 dollar denomination, circulation – 27,476.
  • Issue of 2009, 200 dollar denomination, circulation – 13,765.
  • Issue of 2011, 200 dollar denomination, circulation – 8,408.
  • Issue of 2012, 200 dollar denomination, circulation unknown.
  • Issue of 2014, 200 dollar denomination, circulation unknown. Test emission, polyethylene packaging(википедия говорит assay card).
  • Issue of 2014, 200 dollar denomination, circulation – 2,000. The coins are packaged in a maroon clamshell case.
  • Issue of 2015, 200 dollar denomination, circulation unknown. Test emission, polyethylene packaging.
  • Issue of 2015, 200 dollar denomination, circulation 250. The coins are packaged in a maroon clamshell case.
  • Issue of 2016, 200 dollar denomination, circulation unknown. Test emission, polyethylene packaging.
  • Issue of 2016, 200 dollar denomination, circulation 250. The coins are packaged in a maroon clamshell case.

special

Colored Gold Maple Leaf

Issue of 1999, circulation – 13,025. The first colored gold coin ever issued by the royal mint of Canada.

colored

Also, coins dedicated to the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver were issued in a limited edition (only 200 copies).

Hologram Gold Maple Leaf

Coins of this type were issued as a part of sets. The exception is a coin with a nominal value of 10 dollars of 2001, issued in a separate circulation.

  • Issue of 1999, denominations $1, $5, $10, $20, $50, circulation – 500.
  • Issue of 2001, denominations $1, $5, $10, $20, $50, circulation – 600.
  • Issue of 2001, denomination $10, circulation – 14,614.
  • Issue of 2009, denominations $1, $5, $10, $50, circulation – 750.

hologram

Other releases

  • Issue of 1989, commemorative coin, dedicated to the 10th anniversary of the Maple Leaf series. Designer Walter Ott, circulation – 6,817.
  • Issue of 1997, commemorative coin, dedicated to the 125th anniversary of the creation of the Canadian Mint. Designer Ago Arand, circulation – 12,913.
  • Issue of 1999, commemorative coin, dedicated to the 20th anniversary of the Maple Leaf series. There is a note «20 years ans» on the reverse of the coin.
  • Issue of 2004, commemorative coin, dedicated to the 25th anniversary of the Maple Leaf series. Designer Walter Ott, circulation – 10,000.
  • Issue of 2015, coin “Theory of Relativity”, weight – 1/10 troy ounce. There is an inscription “E = mc2” on the reverse of the coin.
  • Issue of 2015, coin “Gold of the Allies”, weight – 1/4 troy ounce. Designer Joel Kimmel, circulation – 1,500. The reverse of the coin depicts Norwegian and Canadian maple leaves.

Cost of coins

Canadian gold “maple leaves” is a desirable item for every collector and investor. Due to their constant purity, they received international recognition. The cost of such coins depends primarily on the year of issue, place and country of sale, ranging from 190 US dollars for a coin of the standard issue and up to 3,000-4,000 US dollars for the coins with the highest fineness.

Interesting facts

To exclude the possibility of counterfeiting coins, in 2013 and 2015, the Royal Mint introduced innovative methods of coinage, providing genuine protection. In 2013, a small maple leaf with laser micro engraving was added to the back side of the gold coins. In the center of this sign there is a number indicating the year of issue, which is visible only when magnified. In 2015, some radial lines were added to the background of the coin on both sides.

On May 3, 2007, the Royal Mint of Canada presented the latest gold coin of the Maple Leaf series with a nominal value of 1 million US dollars and a metal value of more than 3.5 million dollars. The coin is 50 centimeters in diameter, 3 centimeters thick, and its weight is 100 kilograms. The purity of the coin material is 99.999%. These coins were bought almost immediately, however, on March 26, 2017, one of five copies worth 4 million dollars was stolen from the Bode museum in Germany.

The coin “Gold of the Allies” of the Maple Leaf series is dedicated to an interesting historical event of World War II. In 1940, the treasury of Norway consisted of almost 50 tons of gold worth 240 million kroner, which is approximately 54.5 million dollars in 1940 or 1.8 billion dollars in 2015. When the invasion of the German troops began, the gold was evacuated first by land to Ondalsnes, and then by sea to Tromse. From there, the allied forces brought the gold to the UK, despite constant air and ground attacks of German troops. Finally, it was decided to send gold across the Atlantic to the United States and Canada. It was a difficult transition, because back in those years, German submarine fleet was incredibly strong. However, the crossing was still successful. Out of 50 tons, only 297 gold coins were lost from the barrel, damaged when transported on a British ship. The gold was sold gradually, partly to finance the government in exile. Ten tons of gold coins returned to Norway in 1987.

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